EDUCATION ISSUES

Protect the Premise of Public Education: Protect Democracy

We as a community have the responsibility to provide all children regardless of race, socioeconomic background, or ability with a quality education. That education should be free, appropriate to a child’s needs, and allow a child to fulfill his or her potential.

In order to fulfill that responsibility, we must be able to elect meaningful representation to a local board that oversees a unified public school system.

Voting Rights: Protect the local democratic control of our public schools

In order to fulfill our responsibility to provide all children regardless of race, socioeconomic background, or ability with a quality education, we must be able to elect meaningful representation to a local board that oversees a unified public school system. Our ability to do so has been significantly eroded if not essentially eliminated by laws and policies enacted at the state level. We must protect our public schools from the harmful effects of these laws while we simultaneously advocate for the repeal or amendment of the laws in question.

Advocate for Local Control of Taxpayer Dollars

The Louisiana state charter school law has effectively eliminated local taxpayers’ oversight of tax dollars. In order to fully address this erosion of local control, there must be changes at the state level. At the local level, we must oppose attempts to further divert our tax dollars to private companies and advocate for changes to our Planning and Zoning policies.

Protect the Teaching Profession

We must protect the teaching profession!

The privatization movement devalues teaching as a profession. High-stakes standardized tests, mandated curriculums, burdensome reporting requirements, unfunded mandates redirecting funds from essential resources, and low pay are undermining the profession and our students suffer as a result.

A Meaningful & Fair Accountability System

Our current accountability system is fundamentally flawed. We must eliminate high stakes associated with standardized tests; reduce the number of tests, eliminate punitive consequences; and evaluate our schools and districts using multiple measures.

A Just Reapportionment of Our School Board Following the 2020 Census

In 2014 our School Board was pressured by the business community to reapportion itself. It had just been reapportioned in 2012, but there was a key difference in 2014: the Supreme Court had struck down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act the year before and Congress had since failed to renew it. Consequently, the 2014 reapportionment of our School Board was not subject to the review of the Department of Justice. It not only remapped the districts. It reduced the number of districts by 2. Opponents of the 2014 reapportionment argued the smaller board would allow special interests a disproportionate influence in elections. Recent election outcomes suggest it has. 

 

If we want to have a functional democracy, we must have a fair apportionment of the School Board districts.

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